Tulemar Wildlife

  • Choloepus hoffmanni

    Hoffmann’s Two-Toed Sloth

    • Scientific Name: Choloepus hoffmanni Local name: Perezoso de dos dedos
    • Adult Size: 13-15 lbs
    • Range: From Honduras to Bolivia
    • Behavior: Nocturnal, usually solitary and arboreal. Can be found sleeping hidden in dense canopy or in palm trees during the day, or foraging at night.
    • Diet: Herbivore. Eats leaves, flowers, and fruits. May also consume bird eggs and insects.
    • Reproduction: Usually has one baby at a time (can have twins), gestation 11 months, infant stays with mom 1-2 years. Infants ride on mom’s stomach until they are fully independent.
    • Did you know?
  • Grey-Crowned Central American squirrel monkey

    • Scientific Name: Saimiri oerstedii citrinellus Local name: Mono titi
    • Adult Size: 1.5 lbs
    • Range: Found only in the Pacific lowlands of Costa Rica north of the Térraba River.
    • Behavior: Diurnal, arboreal, live in troops of 20-70 individuals. Very social and often found vocalizing with a high pitched squeak.
    • Diet: Insectivores but also eat fruits and flowers
    • Reproduction: One infant after 6 month gestation. Seasonal breeding in September.
    • Did you know? They are the most endangered monkey species in Central America.
  • Tent-Making Bat

    • Scientific Name: Uroderma bilobatum Local name: Murciélago
    • Adult Size: 16g (0.5 oz) and 6cm (2.3 in) long
    • Range: Common to lowland forests of Central and South America
    • Behavior: Nocturnal, tailless fruit bat that can be found sleeping underneath bent palm leaves (constructed tents with their teeth). They may use the same tent for weeks at a time or alternate sleeping locations.
    • Diet: Mainly feed on fruit but can also eat nectar, pollen, flower parts and insects.
    • Reproduction: Each litter consists of only one pup, which is born after a gestation period of 4–5 months.
    • Did you know? Bats are important seed dispersers
  • Halloween Crab

    • Scientific Name: Gecarcinus quadratus Local name: Cangrejo
    • Adult Size: 5 cm (2 in)
    • Range: Common along the Pacific coast from Mexico to Panama
    • Behavior: Halloween Crab
    • Diet: Herbivorous eating leaf litter and seedlings.
    • Reproduction: Lives in the forest for most of its adult life, but returns to the ocean to breed.
    • Did you know? Also known as the harlequin land crab
  • Black Spiny-tailed Iguana

    • Scientific Name: Ctenosaura similis Local name: Garrobo
    • Adult Size: Males can reach 1.3 meters (4.2 ft)
    • Range: From Mexico through Central America
    • Behavior: Diurnal, excellent climbers, but like rocky habitats to hide. Can be found basking in the sun on rocks or the road.
    • Diet: Primarily herbivores but will also eat smaller animals, eggs and arthropods.
    • Reproduction: A clutch of 20 to 30 eggs incubates for about 90 days.
    • Did you know? They are considered the world’s fastest lizard, running quickly from predators.
  • Brown Pelican

    • Scientific Name: Pelecanus occidentalis Local name: Pelícano
    • Adult Size: 120 cm (47 in)
    • Range: Common inhabitant of all coastal areas throughout the Americas
    • Behavior: Very social living in multi-sex flocks. Often seen soaring over the ocean, diving for fish, or floating on the surface of the ocean.
    • Diet: Eats mostly fish, but sometimes crustaceans or amphibians.
    • Reproduction: Both sexes incubate 3 or 4 eggs that hatch in 28-30 days.
    • Did you know? Males build the nest.
  • Central American Wooly Opossum

    • Scientific Name: Caluromys derbianus Local name: Zorro
    • Adult Size: 300g (10.5 oz)
    • Range: From Mexico to Ecuador in many kinds of habitats. Common in Costa Rica
    • Behavior: Nocturnal, arboreal, solitary; found foraging at night. Great climbers with strong hands and prehensile tails.
    • Diet: Eats insects, small vertebrates, fruits and nectars.
    • Reproduction: Have a litter of 1 to 6 babies that are weaned at about 4 months.
    • Did you know? The Central American Wooly Opossum is a marsupial.
  • Agouti

    • Scientific Name: Dasyprocta punctata Local name: Guatuso
    • Adult Size: 3-4 kg (6-9 lb)
    • Range: Mexico to Western Venezuela
    • Behavior: Like other agoutis, Central American agoutis are diurnal and live in monogamous pairs
    • Diet: They mainly feed on fruits and seeds, and are important seed dispersers.
    • Reproduction: Gestation lasts about 4 months and 1-4 babies can be born at a time. Young live in nest until about 2 months of age.
    • Did you know? They are strong swimmers.
  • Grey-necked Wood Rail

    • Scientific Name: Aramides cajaneus Local name: Cotara chiricote
    • Adult Size: 38 cm (15 in)
    • Range: Throughout Central and South America
    • Behavior: Nocturnal and diurnal, terrestrial, nesting 1-3 meters off the ground. Usually found in monogamous pairs found in mangroves and lowland tropical forests.
    • Diet: Mostly invertebrates and small vertebrates and fruits.
    • Reproduction: Lays 3-7 eggs which both sexes incubate
    • Did you know? Has a loud, repetitive cackling vocalization heard at dusk and dawn.
  • Blue-Crowned Motmot

    • Scientific Name: Momotus coeruliceps Local name: Pájaro bobo
    • Adult Size: 40 cm (16 in)
    • Range: Found within the Central Valley and Pacific Lowlands of Costa Rica, preferring forest edge habitat and shady gardens. Species range throughout Central America.
    • Behavior: Often seen flying in pairs seen perching 1-4 meters above the ground. Will remain inactive for long intervals while they search for suitable prey.
    • Diet: Eats large invertebrates, and small reptiles and amphibians.
    • Reproduction: Tunnel nests in soft soil during the rainy season. Round, white eggs incubate for 3 weeks.
    • Did you know? Often allows humans to get close before flying off, earning the “pájaro bobo” moniker in Costa Rica.
  • Northern Raccoon

    • Scientific Name: Procyon lotor Local name: Mapache
    • Adult Size: 4 kg (8.5 lbs)
    • Range: Very common from Canada to Panama
    • Behavior: Mostly nocturnal, terrestrial and arboreal and mostly solitary but can be seen in pairs. Den in cavities like tree hollows.
    • Diet: mnivorous and opportunistic. Will eat almost anything and often takes advantage of human trash. Natural diet consists of crustaceans, fish, frogs, eggs, fruits, nuts and insects.
    • Reproduction: Babies nurse for 2-4 months after a gestation of 2 months and litters can be between 1-7 infants
    • Did you know? Babies are called "kits".
  • Mantled Howler Monkey

    • Scientific Name: Alouatta palliata Local name: Mono congo
    • Adult Size: 5 kg (11 lbs)
    • Range: From Mexico to Peru and Colombia
    • Behavior: Diurnal, arboreal, usually travel in troops of 10-20 individuals. Found easily by following the loud ‘howl’ of the adult males of the group. Males are larger than females and always dominant. Fully prehensile tail which aids in climbing and weight distribution on thin branches.
    • Diet: Herbivores: eats leaves, fruits and flowers.
    • Reproduction: Infants are born after a gestation of 6 months and stay on their mothers until they are 5 months old; other troop members will help hold the baby.
    • Did you know? Typical lifespan is 25 years.
  • White-nosed coati

    • Scientific Name: Nasua narica Local name: Pizote
    • Adult Size: 5 kg (11 lbs)
    • Range: From Southern US to northwestern Colombia
    • Behavior: Diurnal, terrestrial and arboreal. Males are solitary and known as “coatimundis”; females travel in groups (bands) of up to 25 individuals.
    • Diet: Eats litter arthropods, small animals and fruit.
    • Reproduction: Build nests for litters of 2-7 babies after a gestation of 10 weeks; babies follow mom back to the band at only 5 weeks old. The bands help to protect babies from predators and male coatis.
    • Did you know? Considered to be quite intelligent
  • Variegated squirrel

    • Scientific Name: Sciurus variegatoides Local name: Ardilla
    • Adult Size: 700 grams (1.5 lbs)
    • Range: Mexico to Panama
    • Behavior: Diurnal, mostly arboreal, and usually solitary. Do not store or hide nuts (like acorns) and therefore likely do not play a major role in seed dispersal.
    • Diet: Eats fruits, seeds, flowers, fungi and bark.
    • Reproduction: On average give birth to 4-6 babies and can have up to 2 litters in one year. Infants are born in small nests.
    • Did you know? Have large tails in relation to body size and can be seen in many different color patterns within the same region.
  • Common Basilisk Lizard

    • Scientific Name: Basiliscus basiliscus Local name: Cherepo or Gallego
    • Adult Size: 75 cm (30 in)
    • Range: From Nicaragua to Colombia mostly on the Pacific side.
    • Behavior: Runs on hind legs when threatened, lives near water. Also known as a “Jesus Christ Lizard” because it can walk on water.
    • Diet: Omnivore. Eats insects, fruit, flowers, eggs and small vertebrates.
    • Reproduction: Females lay eggs once a year that hatch in about 3 months.
    • Did you know? The tail is twice as long as the body.
  • chestnut-mandibled toucan

    • Scientific Name: Ramphastos ambiguus swainsonii Local name: Tucan de swainsonni
    • Adult Size: 55 cm (22 in)
    • Range: Found from Honduras to Northern Colombia
    • Behavior: Diurnal and travels in small flocks of 3-12 birds. Are usually seen flying or hopping through the trees.
    • Diet: Omnivorous eating small vertebrates, eggs, nestlings of other birds, insects fruits and seeds.
    • Reproduction: Nest in tree cavities and both sexes incubate the eggs. Babies are fed by both parents and fledge the nest at 6 weeks.
    • Did you know? Thermoregulate using their bills.
  • Fiery-billed aracari

    • Scientific Name: Pteroglossus frantzii Local name: Aracari
    • Adult Size: 43 cm (17 in)
    • Range: Only found in the Southern Pacific region of Costa Rica and Western Panama.
    • Behavior: Diurnal and travels in small flocks of up to 10 birds.
    • Diet: Eats mostly fruit but will also take small vertebrates, insects and eggs.
    • Reproduction: Lays eggs in old woodpecker nests in trees.
    • Did you know? Unlike other toucans, they roost in multi-generational social groups.
  • Mexican hairy dwarf porcupine

    • Scientific Name: Coendou mexicanus Local name: Puercoespín
    • Adult Size: 2kg (4.5 lbs)
    • Range: Mexico to western Panama
    • Behavior: Nocturnal, arboreal and solitary. Often emit a pungent odor. Climbs well with a prehensile tail and moveable pad on hind feet. Often found in the middle layers of the forest.
    • Diet: Seeds, fruits, leaves, flowers and bark
    • Reproduction: One infant is born after a gestation of about 6 months and infants are weaned at 4 months.
    • Did you know? The only species of porcupine found in Costa Rica
  • Kinkajou

    • Scientific Name: Potos flavus Local name: Martilla
    • Adult Size: 2.5 kg (5.5 lbs)
    • Range: Common throughout Mexico to Central Brazil.
    • Behavior: Nocturnal, arboreal, often seen traveling in pairs or triplets. Can be heard crashing through the trees at night and may be mistaken for a monkey due to their prehensile tail and climbing abilities.
    • Diet: 90% of their diet consists of fruit but has a long tongue for eating flower nectar.
    • Reproduction: Kinkajous breed throughout the year, giving birth to one or occasionally two small babies after a gestation period of 112 to 118 days.
    • Did you know? Captive kinkajous have lived up to 40 years.
  • white-headed capuchin

    • Scientific Name: Cebus capucinus Local name: Mono carablanca
    • Adult Size: 3 kg (6.5 lbs)
    • Range: Found in much of Central America and a small portion of South America.
    • Behavior: Diurnal, mostly arboreal. Travel in groups of 10-30 individuals. Very intelligent and aggressive. Great climbers using a mostly prehensile tail.
    • Diet: Omnivorous: eats fruits, insects, reptiles, and small mammals.
    • Reproduction: Usually has one baby at a time after a 5 month gestation. Infant is often climbing by 6 months but stays with troop until older.
    • Did you know? Has a long life-span, exceeding 50 years.
  • Green Iguana

    • Scientific Name: Iguana iguana Local name: Iguana
    • Adult Size: Up to 1.5 meters (5 ft)
    • Range: Extends from southern Mexico to central Brazil, Dominican Republic, Paraguay, and Bolivia and the Caribbean
    • Behavior: Use "head bobs" to communicate with other iguanas, with the frequency and number of bobs having specific meaning.
    • Diet: Primarily herbivores, feeding on leaves.
    • Reproduction: Hatchlings emerge from the nest after 10–15 weeks of incubation.
    • Did you know? Male use their own bodies to shield and protect females from predators, the only species of reptile known to do this.
  • Nine-banded armadillo

    • Scientific Name: Dasypus novemcinctus Local name: Armadillo
    • Adult Size: 4.5-15 lbs
    • Range: From Southern US all the way to Peru. Common in Costa Rica.
    • Behavior: Nocturnal or diurnal, terrestrial and solitary; often found rustling through the leaf litter foraging. Den in burrows.
    • Diet: Eats insects, small vertebrates and fallen fruits.
    • Reproduction: Gestation lasts a little over 2 months, but females can delay implantation. Litters always include 4 identical, same sex babies.
    • Did you know?
  • Northern tamandua

    • Scientific Name: Tamandua mexicana Local name: Oso hormiguero
    • Adult Size: 9-11 lbs
    • Range: From Southern Mexico to the Northwestern tip of South America.
    • Behavior: Diurnal or nocturnal, usually solitary, arboreal and terrestrial. Can be found foraging through trees and leaf litter.
    • Diet: Mostly ants, termites, and other small insects but also eats fruits.
    • Reproduction: Has one baby at a time and infant stays with mom for about 6 months.
    • Did you know? Tamandua’s mouth only opens to the size of a pencil and has no teeth. They are often victims of car accidents when crossing the road.
  • Black Vulture

    • Scientific Name: Coragyps atratus Local name: Zopilote
    • Adult Size: 64 cm (25 in)
    • Range: Commonly found in Southeastern US to Chile and Uruguay in South America.
    • Behavior: Diurnal, often seen gliding through the sky in search of deceased animals.
    • Diet: Diurnal, often seen gliding through the sky in search of deceased animals.
    • Reproduction:
    • Did you know? Often under-appreciated, vultures help to keep the environment clean from decaying flesh.
  • Scarlet Macaw

    • Scientific Name: Ara Macao Local name: Lapa roja
    • Adult Size: 90 cm (35 in)
    • Range: From south-eastern Mexico to the Peruvian Amazon, Colombia, Bolivia, Venezuela and Brazil.
    • Behavior: Diurnal. Usually seen flying in monogamous pairs or multiple pairs with offspring. Unmistakable “Raak” vocalization and beautiful colorful feathers. Nests in hollow trees.
    • Diet: Fruits and seeds
    • Reproduction: The female incubates the eggs for about five weeks, and the chicks fledge from the nest about 90 days after hatching and leave their parents about a year later.
    • Did you know? Once extinct in Manuel Antonio, now repopulated thanks to reintroduction.
  • Brown-throated three-toed sloth

    • Scientific Name: Bradypus variegatus Local name: perezoso de tres dedos
    • Adult Size: 9-11 lbs
    • Range: From Honduras to most of Northern South America
    • Behavior: Can be nocturnal or diurnal, known as cathemeral. Usually solitary and arboreal.
    • Diet: Strict herbivore. Eats leaves, flowers, fruits and other tree parts.
    • Reproduction: One baby at a time (can have twins), gestation 7 months, infant stays with mom 6-9 months. Infants ride on mom’s stomach until they are fully independent.
    • Did you know? Males are easily distinguished from females because of the ‘speculum’ (patch of very short orange/brown hair with black stripe) on their backs.




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